Review: Aukey PB-N37 5,000mAh Mini Power Bank

Aukey PB-N37 5000mAh Mini Power Bank

8.9

Power

8.0/10

Design

8.5/10

Build

10.0/10

Reliability

9.0/10

Pros

  • Enough Power to Charge Most Smartphones Twice
  • Very Portable
  • Minimal Design

Cons

  • No Definite Way of telling Power Capacity
  • Charging and Recharge could be faster
  • Really large thickness and difficult to fit into a pocket

Mini portable power banks are sought out to be the most preferred version of power banks.

They’re chosen most for their portability and the having the ability to be placed into a pocket quite easily. The Aukey PB-N37 Mini is such a power bank that is capable of what it delivers, but its competitors are also able to deliver on what it has.

This mobile power bank charger is able to take mobility to great lengths but find out if the entire package is actually able to deliver on all fronts, read on in this Charger Harbor Review!

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Anker PowerCore 5000 Review

Power

Power Capacity

It’s starting to become a more common thing for mini power banks to start raising their capacities while still holding onto their same portable size. That’s the case here.

This small power bank has a capacity of 5,000mAh and this kind of capacity is growing popularity among portable power devices like the Anker PowerCore 5000 and the Jackery Mini.

With that said, though, not all power banks are created equal. This one may have an original capacity of 5,000mAh but the output capacity of this charger is 4,000mAh.

It’s quite a lot of power that’s being lost, in the end, you’re not actually getting a 5,000mAh capacity.

Even though it’s a disappointment to be losing that much power capacity, the power that the power bank does have to actually use, it does a good at charging smartphones about 2 times or more.

As for tablets, this is a mini power bank and along with a 1,000mAh power capacity loss, you can’t rely on this portable charger to charge a tablet fully but it will charge most tablets halfway through.

As we said, though, this portable charger is competing with others that are similar to it and those other power banks have a very good conversion rate when it comes to charging and are able to keep close to their original power capacity.

 Aukey PB-N37 5,000mAh Mini Power Bank (Output Capacity = 4,000mAh)Phone CapacityAukey PB-N37 5,000mAh Mini Power Bank Left Over Capacity after One Charge

# of Full Charges for the Device
iPhone SE4,000mAh1,624mAh2,376mAh

2.4 Full Charges
iPhone 64,000mAh1,810mAh2,190mAh

2.2 Full Charges
iPhone 6 Plus4,000mAh2,915mAh1,085mAh

1.3 Full Charges
iPhone 6s4,000mAh1,715mAh2,285mAh

2.3 Full Charges
iPhone 6s Plus4,000mAh2,750mAh1,250mAh

1.4 Full Charges
Samsung Galaxy S64,000mAh2,550mAh1,450mAh

1.5 Full Charges
Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge4,000mAh2,600mAh1,400mAh

1.5X Full Charges
Samsung Galaxy S74,000mAh3,000mAh1,000mAh

1.3 Full Charges
Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge4,000mAh3,600mAh400mAh

1.1 Full Charges

Output Charging

Moving onto the charging speed capabilities, the power bank is able to deliver rather mediocre charging speeds.

Most power banks that are rated at its power capacity have faster charging capabilities than those of smaller power banks.

That’s not the case here, this Aukey power bank features nearly the same charging speed as small power banks. The Output charging speed is 5V/1.5A, it’s just a little faster than 1 Amp charging. So you can expect your smartphone to charge near its max speed if its max charging speed is sitting around 1.5 Amps.

However, tablets will not receive their fastest charging because tablets usually have a max charging of 2.4A.

I was expecting a max charging speed of at least 5V/2.0A but that’s not the case here and once again the Aukey’s portable power bank falls under what others are delivering because power banks that are rated at its capacity are

Input Charging (Recharge)

The same goes for the recharge speed of the power bank which is 5V/1.0A. The recharge rate is the base of nearly all portable power banks and just like the Output charging speed, I expected more out of it.

You can expect this power bank to be fully recharged in about 6-7 hours and as result, you most likely won’t be using it the day that you depleted the charger.

To sum up, the power capabilities of this Aukey PB-N37 is that we expected more. We expect this power bank to deliver something greater than what smaller chargers are able to give but that’s not the end result in the power department.

Anker PowerCore Slim Review

Similar Power Bank

Design

Size and Weight:

Following a very similar design scheme as the Anker PowerCore 5000, this power bank is designed as it’s expected to be. The larger capacity definitely shows but first let’s get the dimensions out of the way.

The power bank is 3.6 inches in length and 1.18 inches in width and thickness. The weight of the charger is 4.6 ounces.

The power bank is really small but you can expect the thickness to be thicker than mini power banks of lower capacities and because of the raised capacity of this power bank. With that said, the power bank can be held in a hand easily, placed into the bag easily but a pocket can be quite a stretch.

The power bank’s length is very similar to that of other mini power banks so that’s not the problem, however, the main problem is the thickness of a little over 1 inch.

The charger can feel very uncomfortable if it does fit into your pocket but if you’re wearing pants like sweatpants then this power bank gives no problems when it’s in your pocket.

So putting it into your pocket along with your smartphone can have varied experiences and you should really think how you’re going to configure your usage of this portable charger.

Functional Components:

The portable charger’s functional components are where you’d expect them to be. The charging Output and Input are on the side of the power bank. There’s really no way of telling the capacity of the charger other than when it’s being recharged. That’s right. There’s about a single light with the power bank that changes colors depending on what you’re doing with it. Here are the 3 main colors:

  • RED – The Power Bank is being recharged
  • GREEN – The Power Bank is fully recharged
  • Blue – The Power Bank is charging

So overall there’s no way to know what the capacity is during charging; not only because it uses just 3 colors but also because the power bank doesn’t even have a power button.

Instead, it simply begins to charge when a device is connected to it. It’s convenient features but the lack of LED power indicators is something that is usually standard with a power bank and quite helpful for a user.

Lastly, the shape of the power bank is obviously cylindrical as you’ve already seen, as a result, if you put it onto a flat surface, it may roll off and fall. The form factor of smaller power banks like this is important; the Tylt Mini is able to prove it easily with its roll preventive body.

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Build

Structure and Material:

When it comes to the build quality of this portable charger, there’s not much to say and that’s a good thing.

The body is made of Aluminum. It’s a drop-tested power bank, so if you worry about your power bank getting damaged because you might drop them while you’re carrying it, then there’s really no need to worry.

Tech:

The inner tech of the power bank is most filled with optimization tech that makes the charging with this charger really good.

This means that the power bank won’t hold back on its 1.5 Amp output if the device its charging can take a 1.5A charging speed or higher.

Although it does have safety techs like Over-Current Protection and Temperature Control. Other than that, the charger’s build is mostly about increasing charging efficiency and delivering the most power it can with its 5V/1.5A output.

Reliability

Relying on this power bank is alright if you know what to expect.

The charger does lose a 1,000mAh power capacity during charging so you won’t be relying on the full 5,000mAh that it’s supposed to have.

The charging speed is alright with having a 1.5A charging output speed and a 1.0A recharge speed.

The Output speed is acceptable because most smartphones are able to recharge at 1.5A or lower, but there are cases where some smartphones charge faster than 1.5A and those smartphones won’t be receiving their fastest charging speed.

Then there’s the design of the power bank. The thickness is really the only flaw and can cause some real discomfort if you’re putting it into a jean’s pocket. However, if you’re wearing loose clothing like sweatpants, then this power bank will have no problem comfortably fitting into your pocket.

Overall, when you sum it up; the PB-N37 5000mAh Mini Power Bank is able to deliver a quality charging experience, but it does have its flaws pertaining to its design and power. If you’re able to accept those, then this power bank will be an awesome charger to rely on.

More Mini Power Bank Reviews

Summary:

Power:

1,000mAh is lost during charging, so you’re not getting the full 5,000mAh that it promises. The charging output speed is good enough 1.5A but I was expecting something like 2.0A.

The recharging speed could use some real improvements and provide a 2.0A recharge speed so the power bank has a faster availability time when it’s recharged.

Design:

It’s a similar designed to power banks within its class like the Anker PowerCore 5000.

The portable charger is small but the thickness is what makes the portability short of greatness because it can be quite uncomfortable to fit into a pocket. There’s a lack of power indicators that give a measure of power capacity and there’s no power button.

Build:

The build is simple and that’s what makes it so great. The portable charger has Aluminum body that’s been dropped tested and the only functional components to account for are the charging Output and Input.

The LED power indicator is within the power bank. The charger has safety tech but more importantly, it has the charging tech to optimize charging speed.

Reliability:

This power bank is reliable enough if you know what you’re getting. The charger is reliable for what it offers and nothing more.

Overall, you’re going to be relying on a mini portable charger that under-delivers with its power and somewhat on its design aspects.

Jackery Air 6 Slim Power Bank Review

Specs of the Aukey PB-N37 5,000mAh Mini Power Bank:

  • Capacity:            Advertised: 5,000mAh             Real Capacity: 4,000mAh
  • Output:      5V/1.5A
  • Input: 5V/1.0A via Micro USB Input
  • LED Power Indicators: Single LED Light with different colors to indicate different charging sections
  • Size: 3.6 x 1.18 x 1.18 inches
  • Weight: 4.64 Ounces

Conclusion:

The PB-N37 5000mAh Mini Power Bank is a new generation portable chargers that try hard to keep up with the current standard of mini power banks but it doesn’t seem to understand that you must be able to deliver on what the standard is.

The PB-N37 should be able to give a consumer the full capacity, more power, and just a slightly smaller thickness. Other than that, though, this charger is up there with the others.

2 thoughts on “Review: Aukey PB-N37 5,000mAh Mini Power Bank”

  1. I don’t understand, I have just boufght such a unit (PB-N37), and as the manual shows, when charging : red colour if under 50% of charge in it, green if 50 to 70%, and blue if 70% to full charge. On my first charge when recieved, it began with a green light, that turned to blue after some time (supposedly when it reached 70%).
    So the LED colours don’t mean what you wrote (RED – The Power Bank is being recharged /GREEN – The Power Bank is fully recharged/
    Blue – The Power Bank is charging)…
    I hope there is a way to know when it’s fully charged (does it turn from blue to OFF ?)

  2. how is it that none of these reviews/reviewers bother to tell the user what the different color input charging lights mean? Can’t even find a manual online to tell me. REALLY?

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